Alt account of @WFH@lemmy.world, used to interact in places where federation is still spotty on .world.

  • 6 Posts
  • 118 Comments
Joined 1 year ago
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Cake day: July 4th, 2023

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  • Thanks for the feedback!

    I’m pretty happy with the transparencies tbh. Although on mine, there seems to be two sides, one that gives a fuzzy dirty effect with a lot of stray toner around the actual print (looks like static), and the other side that gives perfectly crisp prints. Unfortunately I can’t really tell the sides apart.

    Apart from that small speck of dust that prevented the transfer at the top left of the logo, the sheet came out perfectly clean, the totality of the toner was transferred to the dial. For PCB transfers where you could probably keep the sheet intact (I had to cut mine to fit between the applied indices), that would also mean the sheet would be almost indefinitely reusable.






  • Ah perfect timing indeed.

    The key takeaway indeed matches yours: it’s not a Voron despite being heavily inspired by it, there are some annoyances but at this price point it’s forgivable and most of them seem to have workarounds (someone in the comments suggested letting the machine fully soak heat before performing Z-offset calibration), the open-source nature might bring a lot of third-party upgrades in the future.

    Also, the reviewer’s unit has some abnormal wear on the belts. Does it match your experience?

    All in all, it seems to be a decent budget CoreXY printer with a very large volume at 1/3 the price of an LDO Voron kit + PIF parts, with a much quicker assembly but some potential pitfalls.

    If this eventually becomes the Ender 3 of CoreXY printers that can be frankensteined into a a much higher quality printer over time, I’m all for it.


  • Than you so much for such a detailed analysis!

    For reference, I’ve had a (heavily modded) Creality Ender 3 V2 for a few years, and I’ve hit a limit in terms of speed and quality.

    The filament path between the extruder and hotend is poorly-constrained, making it a pain to load The auto-z calibration is often just a smidge off It uses a custom nozzle/heater

    If it’s possible to install a Stealthburner instead of the standard extruder/hotend combo, it might solve most of these issues. Maybe some people are working on a V6 or Mk8 style hotend (I have a metric fuckton of Mk8 nozzles laying around)…

    The fans are absurdly loud. All of them.

    OK Noctua upgrades then. Compared to an already absurdly loud Ender 3, is it worse?

    The mainboard is effectively a BTT CB1 and Fystec Cheetah on a single board Their software customizations are of dubious quality

    Would a Voron-style mainboard + RPi + standard Klipper solve these issues or are there fundamental incompatibilities?

    Thanks!









  • Very good choice going with Debian. It is simple, clean, can be as minimal or as “bloated” as you wish, and once you’ve worked out the kinks it will happily run for years without maintenance (except updates of course).

    There’s a steep learning curve because as a user you’re expected to configure stuff yourself (although defaults are most of the time very sensible), but if you’re willing and able to truly learn Linux and the terminal and you’re familiar with your hardware, it’s one of the best platforms out there.